Nate Diaz has had a rocky relationship with the UFC and its President Dana White over the years but that hasn’t stopped him from competing. Longtime UFC ring announcer Bruce Buffer has put Diaz on notice by giving him some harsh advice regarding how he should treat his relationship with the promotion.

His Problems

Diaz has not been seen in the Octagon since his rematch with McGregor back at UFC 202 when he suffered a majority decision loss which came five months after Diaz submitted McGregor in their first bout at UFC 196.

Diaz is set to meet Dustin Poirier in a lightweight showdown at the upcoming UFC 230 pay-per-view event. Since that fight was revealed, it appears to be issues with making this fight happen. It all started at the UFC 25 Anniversary press conference where Diaz went on record by stating that he’s not sure if he will fight at this event.

The issue that he had all came down to the fact that at the end of that press conference. The ending saw the announcement of UFC lightweight champion Khabib Nurmagomedov fighting Conor McGregor at the upcoming UFC 229 event.

Nate Diaz Should Quit Complaining

Bruce Buffer was recently interviewed by TMZ Sports where he noted that Diaz should stop complaining and bow to White everytime he sees him.

“Nate, I heard you made 7 or more million dollars on your last fight. I don’t want to hear complaining about being under promoted by the UFC.” You should be thanking the UFC and bowing to Dana White every time you see him.””

The UFC 230 pay-per-view event is set to take place on Saturday, November 3, 2018 at Madison Square Garden in Manhattan, New York City. The main card is slated to air on pay-per-view at 10 p.m. ET while the preliminary card will air on FOX Sports 1 at 8 p.m. ET and the promotion’s streaming service, UFC Fight Pass.

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Andrew Ravens has been writing about combat sports since 2013 and has been a fan for over ten years! Andrew brings a different style to his work with an insider look into the fighters themselves.