Home UFC TJ Dillashaw Reacts To Cody Garbrandt Releasing Alleged Knockout Footage

TJ Dillashaw Reacts To Cody Garbrandt Releasing Alleged Knockout Footage

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Photo: Kyle Terada for USA TODAY Sports

Earlier tonight UFC bantamweight champion Cody Garbrandt finally posted footage of him allegedly knocking out former champ and current title challenger TJ Dillashaw in training.

The two onetime teammates have been engaged in a bitter rivalry that began on The Ultimate Fighter (TUF) 25 this year, after which they were scheduled to fight for the title in at July’s UFC 213. Garbrandt was forced out, however, delaying the fight to this weekend’s (Sat., Nov. 4, 2017) UFC 217 from New York City.

“No Love” teased the footage, and he took it to a new level by posting it. But some viewers weren’t so sure that it was the earth-shattering KO Garbrandt discussed, as “The Viper” was definitely knocked down but appeared to get back up rather quickly.

Not surprisingly, Dillashaw was one of those doubters, as he told MMA Junkie’s Steven Marrocco that he clearly started fighting right after the knockdown:

“Yeah, tell him to keep playing the video. I get up and start going again. There was no KO like he’s been stating.”

With accusations that Dillashaw essentially ended Team Alpha Male member Chris Holdsworth’s career in addition to performance-enhancing drug use, this footage was the final piece of a brutal all-out assault that the California-based team has mounted towards their hated former brother.

Dillashaw left the team amidst a highly-publicized and abrupt exit from Urijah Faber’s fabled squad, something that was blown out of the stratosphere when Conor McGregor predicted he would abandon Faber and his teammates when he called him a ‘snake’ on TUF.

All that’s left now is to fight with ultra-high stakes on the line this Saturday, and clearly, tensions are at an all-time high after the video tonight – even if Dillashaw appeared calm in response.

How will this affect the anticipated title fight?

  • Fester

    That was then, this is NOW; if past incidents matter, they do not predict the outcome.